Raila Odinga

Month: January 2019

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA ODINGA, EGH, AT THE MULTI-SECTORAL NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION CONFERENCE; BOMAS OF KENYA; JANUARY 25, 2019:

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA ODINGA, EGH, AT THE MULTI-SECTORAL NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION CONFERENCE; BOMAS OF KENYA; JANUARY 25, 2019:

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA ODINGA, EGH, AT THE MULTI-SECTORAL NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION CONFERENCE; BOMAS OF KENYA; JANUARY 25, 2019:
I am honoured to join fellow citizens at this great conference. It is my hope that when the history of our war on corruption is written, this gathering will feature prominently as the point from which we turned tables on the crime.
I am not here to prescribe what should be done. I am here to share my thoughts and experiences.
My thoughts are not in any way superior to the others that have but shared here.
I wasn’t here yesterday, and others may have said some of what I will say here but that should be an indication of the universality of our experiences.
Over the years, one thing that has intrigued me is our attitude as citizens towards this whole issue of corruption.
I am talking about the sympathetic and apologetic attitude we have developed for corruption and its architects and how we go out of our way to give the corrupt and their activities good sounding names by refusing to call them by their real names.
Most African societies have no word for corruption. In our mother tongues, people who take what is not theirs are called thieves. Occasionally we refer to such people as “wakora”, crooks, conmen but they are generally and simply understood to be thieves and called as such.
That is what we call a person who tricks you of your land, who takes your cow, uses flowery language to get money from you, who charges more than the real cost or who hides part of the proceeds for personal gain. No matter which Kenyan society you ask, such a person is called a thief. And people are warned against such characters.
As children, our parents warned us against being seen with so and so, against marrying in such a family because they are thieves. They are bad people. They were rejects in society.
Over time, there has been a systematic laundering of this crime, its perpetrators and its proceeds.
We launder them in church, at social events like weddings, at harambees and during times of tragedies sometimes caused by the crimes of the very same people.
We view those who steal from us as achievers and as real men and women struggling with life.
Those who steal from us and who then give back partly out of guilt and partly to buy our admiration and silence are seen to be generous or development conscious even when we know they are not.
We welcome them to social and religious events with open arms and cheers and roll out the red carpet for them but frown at the chicken thief and look for tyres to lynch them.
Why have we changed and made stealing something whose nature and dimensions are difficult to understand and whose real name we refuse to pronounce? How has this impacted our war on this crime?

Still on the issue of attitude, there is some sympathy and reverence we have developed for corrupt people; the thieves. We kind of feel sorry for the big shot who has been taken to court for stealing billions using the pen or through electronic bank transfers while we feel nothing for the ragged man accused of stealing a cow or a chicken.
The ordinary citizen looks sorry, the police officer looks sorry and even the judges look sorry. We have contributed to this problem as a society. We need to end it as a society before we even before we bring in the government.
And the issue of attitude features strongly on our idea about the government. We seem to believe that the government is some alien being or institution that grows money on trees and that whoever steals government money has not stolen from us because government money is nobody’s money.
In fact, such a person is seen as a hero who has conquered some enemy. Yet the truth is that the government has no money of its own. It only has our taxes.
For every money stolen from the government, the government will most likely raise more taxes or cut down on services it provides to us.
Then there are our institutions, the courts of law, the anti-corruption agencies, the police, etc. There is every indication that the thieves do not sleep as they look for ways to steal.
They use the stolen money to hire the most crooked lawyers or buy judges and other officers in the chain. We are witnessing very clear cases of collusion in our courts, with investigators and prosecutors.
Consequently, we are witnessing a trend where suspects rush to court to stop DCI and DPP from arresting and charging them with corruption. And the courts are granting such suspects their wishes.
This is curious and disturbing. Am not sure whether a chicken thief out there can go to court and get such a favourable ruling.
If suspects feel that they should not be arrested and be taken to court and the judges agree with them, what are we supposed to do with those suspects?
When a man who has stolen money mean for drugs in a local hospital asks judges to stop his arrest and the judges agree with him, what are the mothers whose children died for lack of drugs supposed to do?
I am equally not sure we can tame graft when we allow those charged with it to be out on bail and return to their work stations, cleanse or interfere with records then return to court a year later. What kind of thief with his or her senses intact would return to office and safely guard documents and contacts they know will be used against them?
I am not sure that we are keen to get to the bottom of the problem or we are just going through motions.
How about the issue of innocence and guilt? Who is on trial in our courts or rather who should be on trial? Is it the prosecutor or the suspect? The trend here is that it is the DPP and his team that are on trial.

STATEMENT IN RESPONSE TO NAIROBI TERROR ATTACKS

STATEMENT IN RESPONSE TO NAIROBI TERROR ATTACKS

STATEMENT IN RESPONSE TO NAIROBI TERROR ATTACKS;

Once again, the devil has struck at the heart of our country. We wish to express our deep shock and disgust at the abhorrent acts of terror that occurred yesterday, January 15, 2019 evening. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families at this extremely difficult time. We stand firmly on the side of Kenya and all people of goodwill in this war with evil that terrorists represent.
We condemn in the strongest terms possible this dastardly act of cowardice perpetrated by enemies of human civilization.

We commend our security forces for the robust, rapid and coordinated response to this evil that saw lives saved and the country reassured. We commend our citizens for being each other’s keeper and responding to appeals for blood donations and we appreciate the professionalism of our care givers and first responders.

We thank the international community for standing with Kenya at this critical juncture. We saw a global coalition against terror in action in this attack. We assure the international community that we will stand with the Government of Kenya and all forces for good in the global campaign against terrorism.

All indications are that as a nation, despite persisting challenges with regard to securing our homeland, we are learning and getting wiser and better with every unfortunate attack. Our goal must remain the ability to completely keep these forces of evil out of our borders and weeding them entirely out of our mist. As a nation, we must reject divisions of all sorts be they religious, ethnic, regional or even political.

Such divisions are what terrorists thrive on. Where we have closed ranks, terrorists try to plant fear and suspicion to create space for them to thrive. We must reject all such attempts. The terrorists who attacked us this past day did not seek to know the tribes, religion, party affiliation or region of origin of the victims.

Their mission was to cause pain and fear and they proceeded to do so without seeking details. Our survival depends on standing together against these agents of doom. We appeal to Kenyans to continue being each other’s keepers and continue offering help where it is needed.

We appeal to the international community to continue standing with Kenya. As citizens, we must continue working with security agencies during this operation and well into the future in order to secure our land.
To the terrorist-take note that you shall never intimidate nor destroy the spirit of the people of Kenya by your beastly acts.

Kenya shall continue discharging its obligations to its citizens and commitment to the civilized community of nations without looking over its shoulders.
The fallen victims are our heroes in the war against international terrorism. God Bless Kenya.

H.E RAILA ODINGA
H.E STEPHEN KALONZO MUSYOKA
JANUARY 16, 2019.

REMARKS OF  H.E RAILA A. ODINGA DURING THE PUBLIC LECTURE BY THE FORD FOUNDATION PRESIDENT, DARREN WALKER, TAIFA HALL, 10TH JANUARY 2019.

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA A. ODINGA DURING THE PUBLIC LECTURE BY THE FORD FOUNDATION PRESIDENT, DARREN WALKER, TAIFA HALL, 10TH JANUARY 2019.

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA A. ODINGA DURING THE PUBLIC LECTURE BY THE FORD FOUNDATION PRESIDENT, DARREN WALKER, TAIFA HALL, 10TH JANUARY 2019.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Let me begin by thanking the University of Nairobi for hosting us this afternoon. It is always a great pleasure and honor to be and exchange views at this great academic institution that has shaped opinions and policies of our nation over the years.

A robust exchange of views is healthy for any society and Kenya is no exception. In fact, meeting here to exchange views as we do today continues to remind us of our journey of liberation as a nation. It was not always a given that anybody could walk into Taifa Hall and deliver a lecture. We fought for this freedom and we must continue to guard jealously this hard won freedom to gather, to express ourselves and to hold opinions without looking over our shoulders.

I always value listening to leaders from all backgrounds as well as to accomplished and aspiring scholars to enrich my thoughts on the way forward for our country, Kenya and for Africa and I must admit I have benefitted immensely from these engagements over the years.
As you know, in the year 2012, the Foundation honoured me as a Champion of Democracy while I was serving as the second Prime Minister of the Republic of Kenya.

But our ties run deeper. Your early investment in developing the civil service in the immediate post-independence period, your strong investment in the International Fellowships Program (IFP) has produced many leaders that today offer their skills and vision towards a much more equal, fairer and just Kenya. We thank you for investing in us.

As a country, we continue to face many challenges; challenges of corruption, job creation, national cohesion, democratization and delivery of high standards of living for our citizens particularly in critical areas like health, education and infrastructure.

But I believe we are on the path to turning the corner on these challenges. We are on the path to rallying our citizens to jointly confront these challenges without fear and minus the tribal lenses that some would want us to wear.

Nations are judged by how they navigate turbulent and challenging times like the ones we are going through. After a difficult election in 2017 that left the nation on the brink, President Uhuru Kenyatta and I agreed to come together and help this country retrace its steps and stabilize. That get together has been hailed across the world as Kenya’s last second chance. We are determined to make it count.

I want to believe that as a country, we have learnt our lessons and that is why we have retraced our steps and our history through the Building Bridges to the New Kenyan Nation initiative. We are focused on building a resilient democracy that takes into consideration our unique history and current circumstances.

We are focused on creating a society where we can compete for power openly and even disagree strongly but we don’t lose sight of our goals as a nation. There must be a common purpose; some national good we are pursuing as a nation and that we must not allow to be derailed by our wish to be or to look great as individuals.

We are focused on building a society in which when our dreams as individuals appear to be a threat to our collective dream as a nation, we must be prepared to sacrifice those personal dreams. Fighting corruption, tribalism, impunity is a good place to start. We must not let go of the war on these vices. We must not agree to be derailed by the lords of these vices.

To the young men and women gathered here, I wish to assure all of you that as leaders, we are going all out, doing what was once unthinkable and making all necessary sacrifices to address the problems we face and bequeath you a better country.

My friend President Bill Clinton said that if he were to sum up his view of public life, it would come down to… “Are people better off when you quit than when you started? Do children have a brighter future? Are things coming together instead of being torn apart?” I fully subscribe to this view. It is a principle by which I have lived and will continue to embrace.

Many of you here call me Baba, and I accept the title with all humility. I want to assure you that as a father, I am determined to ensure that things work for you, that you have a brighter future and that Kenyans are better off when I quit than when I started. This is the reason we agreed with President Uhuru Kenyatta to put aside everything else and work for Kenya.

To help us realize this dream, I wish to appeal to the youth to aspire to higher ideals that they shall never compromise on for the sake of Kenya. Don’t live in vain. Don’t be a spectator in the affairs of your country. That is the spirit of civil engagement.

Thank you and God bless you.