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Visit to Kajiado County

Visit to Kajiado County

I was happy to be in Kajiado County engaging the residents regarding the National Reconciliation Initiative that we have embarked on.
They pledged their support in the coming days towards this crucial and much needed undertaking for us as a people.
I thank them all for wishing us well on this journey as well as, their very warm welcome. Asanteni sana

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA ODINGA; EGH; AT THE FIFTH DEVOLUTION CONFERENCE; KAKAMEGA, APRIL 24, 2018.

REMARKS OF H.E RAILA ODINGA; EGH; AT THE FIFTH DEVOLUTION CONFERENCE; KAKAMEGA, APRIL 24, 2018.

I am honoured to join you in celebrating our sixth year of Devolution.

In the last five years, this gathering was a men only affair. Today we have three female governors. I recognize and welcome the madam governors to this club.

It is my hope that after the next elections, we will have at least ten female governors. Devolution must bridge the gender gap in the country’s leadership.

Our people are definitely not enjoying the best they could, but they definitely have improved access to facilities and services like healthcare, roads, markets centres, early child development and agricultural services than before, thanks to devolution.

This should be a constant reminder to us never to fear or oppose change for the sake of it. “Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything,” as George Bernard Shaw told us.

Devolution has proved that neither geography nor history is destiny. Nations and regions are poor or rich not because of their geography or their past but because of their ability or inability to make the best of their environment.

We now have tarmac roads and airports in long neglected parts of Kenya like Lodwar, Maralal and Wajir. Hospitals have sprouted in Wajir and Garissa. North Eastern can now access clean water through borehole drilling programmes. Processing plants are sprouting in Makueni, Uasin Gishu, Nyandarua and Kirinyaga among others, underscoring the potential of counties as the next centres of industrialization and job creation.

A 35-year old mountain of garbage has been taken out in Kisumu, underscoring devolution’s capacity to stop the march of environmental degradation in the countryside.

Unfortunately, these positive developments mean that there will be greater expectations of the county governments. Voters expect progress to be a straight forward march into the future, not a zigzag back and forth journey.

Devolution’s achievements should therefore not be celebrated without taking into full account the challenges ahead.

The challenges and areas of possible conflict are glaring. For instance, the National Government is pursuing its Big Four agenda…Food security, affordable housing, manufacturing and affordable healthcare. Most of these are devolved functions.

Making sure their implementation by the National Government does not undermine devolution or result in duplication and conflict is a challenge we must address.

There are two issues which I consider cardinal to the success or failure of devolution; GOOD GOVERNANCE AND POLITICAL LEADERSHIP.

Good leaders need vision for the work they set out to do and a clear mission on how to pursue the vision.  Often, such vision and mission are stated in a Manifesto.

In a county, the governor’s manifesto must find its way into the COUNTY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CIDP) to inform social and economic transformation.

Implementing manifestos cannot be done unless the governor knits together a team that can deliver. You are therefore as good as your team. But even here, there are challenges.

How do governors implement their manifestos in an environment where the Big Four agenda includes devolved functions? A solution has to be found.

At this point, I wish to single out some very immediate threats to devolution and your tenures that we need to address this early.

Governors and the county public services continue to be accused of engaging in self-enrichment.

Too many governors and their executive are viewed with suspicion by voters and many are under active investigation by the EACC. There is nepotism and cronyism in counties. And too many counties are failing to come up with clear pro-youth programmes to address unemployment.  People pursuing business with counties also talk of an elaborate network of County Assembly speakers, leaders of majority, CECs, county works supervisors and county clerks, among others, whose sole purpose is to make money from public works projects. These officials have the capacity and audacity to paralyze, delay and stall development projects.

MCAs and county Speakers are particularly being accused of conflict of interest. Often they are the contractors while at the same time purporting to be carrying out oversight roles.

The quest for cuts has also led to a craze for allowances by members of County Assemblies that is also paralyzing counties.

Governors have to pay for their Cabinets to be approved. To date, there are counties that are yet to form full cabinet because of the standoff between governors and MCAs.

Members of County Assemblies are constantly on so-called bench-marking and team building trips that are essentially acts of bribery by the Executive to have their agenda approved and a quest for allowances. This corruption network is eating devolution from inside out.

We have to stop it or it will altogether kill our most important gift to ourselves ever since our fathers brought us independence. Sometimes, the idea of corruption is based on rumors and perception. But there are also cases where eyebrows have been raised because the life styles of people have changed overnight. The best way to stop rumors from assuming the pedestal of truth is for the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission to undertake objective life style audits of suspects.

Two institutions are key to proper financial management and accountability: The internal audit department, and the procurement department. Working hand in hand within the finance department, they can make or break good governance in the county. The governor has a duty to ensure that the people appointed to these departments are qualified, competent, accountable and smart.

 

The good news is that fighting corruption and shielding devolution are no longer matters of partisan debate. The MoU of the now famous handshake on March 9 prioritizes making counties deliver to the people. It also identifies corruption as an existential threat to the country. The President and I are agreed that we must fight corruption from a wide and common front. We shall not provide sanctuaries for perpetrators of corruption. We will strongly support whistleblowing from all Kenyans.

We have mandated the public to report corruption whenever they witness it but without witch hunt. Very soon, the corrupt will be on their own.

But governors also have their side of the story. For instance, counties are failing to attract high calibre, public-spirited personnel because of the existing pay structure.

Because of this, policy papers are wanting in some counties and many governors lack quality advisory services.

There seems to be a genuine need to review pay policy to enable counties attract quality staff without necessarily increasing costs.

We need to help our counties generate funds that would help them finance quality staffing in addition to providing services. One way to do this is to review and rationalize taxation policies.  Counties have very small tax collection bases. In tourism sector for instance, VAT, Catering Levy and Tourism Levy all go to the national government. Overall, counties have only about 15 per cent taxation revenue base. There is too much confusion in the management of Roads sector with the National Government laying claim to most roads while doing nothing to maintain them.

We also need to review the relationship between regional authorities like Lake Basin Development Authority, Coast Development Authority, Tana and Athi Development authorities and the County and National Governments. And we must help our counties resolve boundary disputes. Let me make a brief mention of wealth creation in counties based on investments, own- revenue generation and employment creation. I encourage counties to remain aggressive in creating the institutional basis for investments by utilizing all the legal instruments available for doing this.

 

Here I would like to refer to the PPP law, the Special Economic Zones, Export Processing Zones, business incubation institutions, agribusiness investments, skills and business development centers, and so on.

Further, counties should not simply rely on getting locally generated revenues through licenses, rates and fees. The real difference in own revenue generation will only come from improved productivity.

Counties must demonstrate to the National Government that they are coming of age. The National Government must also be ready to provide the necessary back up when counties take investment initiatives for employment and wealth creation. The first five years of devolution witnessed enormous constraints in taking initiatives for investments in the counties. The PPP legal framework was particularly unclear. A lot has since been done to improve this.

However, the National Government still needs to do more in helping counties with transaction advisers and undertaking capacity building functions in line with the Inter-Governmental Relations Act. Very soon, we may need to address the issue of access to external funding in counties with the National Government as an intermediary given the transfer of functions in line with Schedule Four of the Constitution.

I want to end by saying something about the structure and viability of counties as presently constituted and the Building Bridges to a New Kenya Initiative. We continue to encourage our counties to explore the formation of economic blocs to address some of the challenges identified. This is also part of the MoU of the Building Bridges to a New Kenyan Nation initiative. Counties must work together regardless of the political affiliation of their governors, senators and MCAs.

I therefore laud the formation of the 14-county Lake Region Economic Bloc and appeal to the County Assemblies cooperate and pass legislation to aid the realization of the bloc. I encourage all counties that are exploring such formations to soldier on and their assemblies to cooperate. Going forward however, and as a matter of lasting solution to the problem posed by the sizes of the economies of devolved units, I want to propose to this forum that we need to bite the bullet and revisit the structure of devolution.

The Bomas Draft Constitution divided Kenya into 14 regions, each made up of several districts. The intention was to create units with the size and population that made them economically viable. It is time to look at how to recover this original spirit. My proposal is that we adopt a three-tier system that retains the current counties, creates regional governments and retains the National Government and with very clear formula for revenue sharing.

Finally ladies and gentlemen, you are one of the most critical stakeholders in the future of our country. I wish to invite all of you to support and take steps to the realization of the Building Bridges to the New Kenyan Nation initiative contained in the MoU we signed with President Uhuru Kenyatta. We aim is modest, humble and noble. We want to address ethnic antagonism, lack of national ethos, inclusivity, strengthen devolution, end divisive elections, ensure safety and security, end corruption and ensure shared prosperity. I appeal to you to embrace the document and its spirit.

Thank you. God bless you.

STATEMENT BY H.E. RAILA ODINGA AT THE LAUNCH OF BRIDGE TO NEW KENYA INITIATIVE

STATEMENT BY H.E. RAILA ODINGA AT THE LAUNCH OF BRIDGE TO NEW KENYA INITIATIVE

Fellow Kenyans.

In the life of any nation, a time comes when the people and their leaders must audit the progress made towards the attainment of the goals and prayers laid out at the founding of the nation.

Abraham Lincoln said… “If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do, and how to do it.”

When such times come, the leaders entrusted to secure the goals, in our case: justice, unity, peace, liberty and prosperity for all; have a duty to reflect on their performance in the search for these hallowed goals.

Such a time has come for Kenya.

Fifty four years into independence, we are challenged to audit our progress towards the ideals for which our fathers fought to establish a free and independent country and for which many of our compatriots died.

We, the leaders are equally summoned to reflect on our performance towards the achievement of our nation’s aspirations.

This audit and introspection has been a long time coming.

Throughout our independence history, we have had doubts on how we have conducted our affairs in the face of growing divide along ethnic, religious and political lines. Regrettably, we have responded to our challenges by mostly running away from them.

We have moved from year to year, election to election, never pausing to deal with the challenges that our diversity was always going to pose to our efforts to create a prosperous and united nation. Consequently, the ties that bind us are today under the severest stress.

Our diversity appears destined to be a curse to ourselves today and to our children tomorrow.

In the past, we have given a lot of attention to institutional reforms in the hope that these could lift us to the next level of nationhood and make us a blessed land.

Seven and a half years ago, we gave to ourselves a new Constitution. We put our faith in it as the instrument to revolutionize our nation. In this and many other ways, we created some of the best hardware any country has ever possessed to engineer their affairs.

We must be courageous enough to admit that it has not worked. It has failed because we are yet to upgrade our software. We have been pouring new wine into old wineskins. The Gospel tells us that new wine needs new wineskins.

The time has come for us to confront and resolve our differences. These differences are becoming too entrenched.

No two Kenyans agree on the origins of the differences and what they portend.

Millions of our children continue to be born and married into these differences. People are dying out of these differences.

Many of these differences are already well entrenched in the third generation of Kenyans and are currently leaking into the fourth generation in primary and secondary schools.

Yet in many instances, Kenyans cannot remember why and where they disagreed in the first place.

As we fight ostensibly to save ourselves from each other, the reality is, we need to save our children from ourselves.

My brother and I have therefore come together today to say this descent stops here.

We refuse to allow our diversity to kill our nation. We refuse to be the leaders under whose watch Kenya slid into a failed nation.

This is a call to self-reflection. We have to look into ourselves and challenge our readiness to make the changes that will allow our institutional reforms to work.

So long as we remain divided, acrimonious, selfish and corrupt, no amount of institutional reform will better our lives.

The reform process will become an exercise in diverting attention from our own failings and taking refuge in blame game.

We therefore seek your partnership in this initiative fellow Kenyans. We are all sailing in this one ship. We must come together to scoop out the water that has been sipping in or we shall capsize.

We have travelled too far to turn back.

We would never make it back to the shore.

Yet, we can’t make it to our destination either. Our only option is to come together and scoop out these waters of animosity that we have been pouring into the boat before we all sink.

Once again, as Lincoln said… “The result is not doubtful. We shall not fail — if we stand firm, we shall not fail.

God Bless Kenya.

Thank you.

THE MAN WHO KNOWS HOW TO SPEAK THE ‎LANGUAGE OF THE COMMON MAN

THE MAN WHO KNOWS HOW TO SPEAK THE ‎LANGUAGE OF THE COMMON MAN

• Raila successfully brought Multi Party democracy to your doorstep (when most of Kenyans ‎including the digital thieves stayed safely at home eating Nyayo money while he was being ‎jailed, tortured and exiled)

• Raila successfully removed Moi’s oppressive regime out of office

• Raila successfully brought you Kibaki Tosha

• Raila successfully brought You a new constitution with devolution smiling at you

• Raila successfully defended the Mau Forest. This is a water tower that affects not only Kenya but the whole of East Africa. It affects so many lakes like Nakuru Baringo, ‎Bogoria, Natron and Turkana, and rivers like Njoro, Mara etc, it affects forests, rain and its after effects of its destruction would be ‎enormous. it affects many communities and tourism activities in the Maasai Mara Game Reserve and ‎the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem will suffer if the water tower is destroyed. He sacrificed votes to save Mau Forest. (his ‎detractors will thank him later)‎
• 
Raila reclaimed public road reserves by ordering the demolition of buildings and structures ‎erected on such lands by corrupt rich, powerful and influential businessmen – this needs balls ‎and guts and not soft spoken weak leaders

• Raila led the most dynamic roads infrastructure Kenya has ever seen since independence, one ‎of the most outstanding specimen of a road , Thika Highway still stands still to be appreciated ‎to date

• 
Raila guaranteed peace to Kenya when he refused to bring Kenya into anarchy by accepting a ‎power sharing deal instead of fighting for power even though he knew he had won the 2007 ‎elections by far.‎

• Raila is not afraid of suspending powerful ministers who have been suspected to leech the ‎country like when he removed the powerful Agriculture Minister William Ruto because of a serious ‎maize scandal

 Raila led the nusu mkate government successfully and all you have to do is go back to ‎history to check on the nusu mkate government achievements to know what he is all about – ‎he was the co principle leader of a successful stint of a successful regime where he guided the ‎Old and weary Mr. Kibaki through to a successful term.

WHEN RAILA SPEAKS, PEOPLE LISTEN – THE MAN WHO KNOWS HOW TO SPEAK THE ‎LANGUAGE OF THE COMMON MAN

MEETING OF NASA SUMMIT

MEETING OF NASA SUMMIT

The Summit, the highest organ of the National Super Alliance, met this morning and decided as follows:

1. That the single biggest threat to the stability and economic well-being of Kenya, now and into the future, is the enduring culture of sham elections with pre-determined outcomes. In this regard, the coalition will be dedicating its efforts in the coming months to the single issue of the realisation of electoral justice which entails a thorough reform of the electoral body, the laws governing it and the nature of the relationship it maintains with State agencies that influence its operations.

2. That as currently constituted, and given the amendments that Jubilee introduced to the election laws agreed on in the run-up to the 2017 polls, and having presided over elections marred by illegalities and irregularities, the IEBC cannot preside over the review of boundaries expected in 2018.

3. The coalition asks all its members to equally put singular focus on electoral justice and vacate all discussions of 2022 elections. NASA remains firm that there can be no elections in 2022 unless the causes of the irregularities and illegalities witnessed in 2017 are fully identified and addressed.

4. That conscious of the urgency of the matter of electoral justice to the future stability of the country and conscious of the other challenges facing the country; including environmental degradation, food shortage and looming hunger, rising debt burden and enduring divisions along ethnic, regional and party lines, NASA remains committed to dialogue in the interest of the nation but remains cognisant of the fact that Kenyans are running out of patience and the window is slowly closing.

5. That NASA continues to view the Bill being pushed by Jubilee leaning MP William Kassait Kamket to create a one term, seven year president and an executive Prime Minister as head of government as a Jubilee plot to jump the gun. The coalition therefore wants Jubilee to come clean on the Bill.

6. The coalition will shortly convene a joint Parliamentary Group meeting to cement its position on these matters and particularly on the matter of electoral justice.

Today’s meeting was attended by all members of the Summit.

H.E. Raila Odinga, Coalition Leader
Hon. Stephen Kalonzo Musyoka, Co-Principal
Sen. Moses Wetangula, Co-Principal
Hon. Wycliffe Musalia Mudavadi, Co-Principal

 

Black Panther Movie-the achievements of African actors

Black Panther Movie-the achievements of African actors

The achievements of African actors globally exemplify the skillsets we as a people possess and make us proud. When we set our minds and efforts to achieving lofty goals we attain them like everyone else, many times surpassing expectations thus there is no justification in this day and age for anyone to misguidedly patronize us as a people.

I was very happy and proud to attend the premier screening of the Black Panther Movie in which one of our very own, Kisumu Governor Anyang Nyongo’s daughter Lupita starred and played a leading role in. Let us all celebrate the achievements of African actors and actresses and thank them for putting us on the global map

LETTER TO H.E. CYRIL RAMAPHOSA FROM H.E. RAILA AMOLO ODINGA

LETTER TO H.E. CYRIL RAMAPHOSA FROM H.E. RAILA AMOLO ODINGA

Your Excellency, Comrade, and Dear Brother,

I write on behalf of all overjoyed Kenyans and indeed Africans who were absolutely thrilled today to finally see you take the helm of the great nation of South Africa. The excitement is particularly strong as there is a conviction that you will restore the bright flame of leadership that has diminished in the land of our dearest Nelson Mandela.

All of Africa, now in so much need of inspirational figures, is confident that with your dynamic past and leadership history, the recent national and continental vacuum will shortly begin to be a thing of the past. All African democrats are praying for your success, since no other country’s leader anywhere in the world has the expectations of an entire continent riding on him. So your election yesterday is a victory not only for the African National Congress and South Africa but for all those forces across the continent still fighting for the full democratic and economic emancipation of all our people.

I recall our discussion a year ago when we were preparing to run for the leadership of our respective political parties in Kenya and South Africa. We both emphasized the imperative of renewed African democratization as the indispensable base for building a vibrant continental economy with an equitable distribution of wealth as that alone would help contribute to the global movement for moral and ethical leadership. You now have the opportunity and honour to fulfill that vision, with my full support of course.

You were one of the pivotal architects who supported our beloved Mandela in creating a South Africa that captured the imagination of the entire world. It will not be easy to restore that respect in our turbulent times, where a few take too much from their countries and leave misery and instability in their trail.

Knowing you as I do, I know you will forcefully pursue the challenge for both South Africa as well as the continent, immense though it is. With South Africa’s still vibrant global standing, I am confident you will restore to it the high respect that it, and the continent, enjoyed under the fabled leadership of Nelson Mandela in particular.

As you can no doubt imagine, Kenyans were electrified when they heard you twice use our language Swahili and the phrase “Not Yet Uhuru” to encapsulate the challenges that still lie ahead if we are to fulfill the hope of human dignity that our legendary freedom fighters nourished for every African. They thought that only those in East Africa knew call to action, coined and immortalized as it was by your friend and my late father Jaramogi Oginga Odinga.

With my sincere best wishes,

RAILA AMOLO ODINGA

People’s President,

Republic of Kenya

SWEARING IN

SWEARING IN

Yesterday’s swearing in could not have gone better for Raila, NASA or Kenya. A vast, virtually limitless crowd celebrated Africa’s first ever duality of presidencies, with the conviction that this would bring closer the prospect of peaceful change against regimes which rule with a murderous fist.

But despite this revolutionary resonance, the mammoth event was utterly peaceful. Not a single act of violence was reported, even though that was widely predicted in the scaremongering we saw. The Nation’s headline yesterday proved thankfully wrong: “Violence Looms as Nasa Digs in on Oath.” But Raila still had no hesitation about going it alone after he was left significantly more exposed by co-principals Kalonzo, Musalia and Wetangula staying away at the last minute for the swearing-in.

A major outcome from yesterday’s event was that it put the lie to repeated accusations against Raila that his supporters cause mayhem whenever they attend rallies. Did so many of them need to have been killed by police in the last few months?

Praise is due to the wiser heads which persuaded Uhuru, Ruto and the police chiefs to set aside their threats to unleash force against those participating in the swearing-in, even though it was in their own self-interest.

But against this seeming Jubilee wisdom, we witnessed two highly self-destructive decisions which gave a powerful boost to Raila’s democratic, electoral-justice message.  As the NY Times highlights today, the television blackout and designating NRM an organized criminal group “seemed to add legitimacy to Mr. Odinga’s oath, which some observers had earlier dismissed as political theater.”

Those two draconian measures also made what might have been a small story for the foreign press into a much more loaded one, as it revealed dictatorial tendencies that the Uhuru, Ruto regime has repeatedly exhibited. Thanks to those two government directives, the world now knows better than it might have that Kenya has a People’s President, Raila Odinga – and that the other president is not such a nice guy.

Preceded as it was by threats President Uhuru Kenyatta personally delivered to senior media figures when they were summoned to State House, the closing down of all three main TV channels, the first time in our history, hurt him badly with Kenyans, journalists in particular. Some spoke out very strongly. “There’s no doubt anymore that the government is out to cripple the media,” veteran journalist David Aduda said to the NY Times. “It shows that we have a very intolerant government that does not respect media freedom.” I believe we have not yet heard any strong language from our envoys about this assault on the media by Uhuru.

Some have minimized the importance of Raila’s having been sworn in as President as it conferred no State power. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Jubilee knows that best, which is why it had said the event was treasonous and the organizers would be tried and hanged.

The swearing-in’s most potent consequence is the creation of authoritative alternative institutions which will hold currently-absent discussions on how to tackle Kenyans’ pressing concerns at both presidential and parliamentary levels. Prices of maizemeal for example have gone through the ceiling again, and crime on even previously safe Nairobi streets has exploded, but there are no known plans about tackling these and other crises from Uhuru or the National Assembly.

With competing institutions now, it will much easier for Kenyans to see which cares for them. But most important will be the efforts to try to fix the electoral mess, which of course will come from, and strengthen, only the NASA side of the divide.

Finally, a lot is being made of in certain quarters about the political impact of the three co-principals staying away from the event yesterday. I had written here three days ago that the three made no bones about being political moderates, although they had grown bolder in the opposition. Nevertheless, I had pointed out that one reason they were still with Raila after Uhuru forced himself back into office was the unequivocal public insistence of their bases that they stick with NASA and Raila and the swearing-in plans.

The three have indicated that they are still fully with Raila in his battle for change. If that is in fact true, then their absence yesterday will not mean all that much. But their no-shows definitely dented their future standing as opponents of the status quo willing to fight for change, a trait that Raila amply possesses and which is what catapulted him to the political front ranks nearly two decades ago. Unless there is a dramatic development shortly, the three leaders’ caution will open up the inevitable campaign as to who will inherit Raila’s mantle when he retires.

One thing we can conclude comfortably is that an already strong Raila Odinga, the country’s most popular leader since 2007 with three presidential election victories under his belt, has emerged much stronger than he was three days ago, while all the other five have been diminished.

Salim Lone, Adviser,
H.E. The People’s President Raila Odinga

PASSING OF PROF. CALESTOUS JUMA

PASSING OF PROF. CALESTOUS JUMA

 

The cruel hand of death has today claimed one of our finest scholars and global ambassadors.

Over the years, I have had the opportunity to interact and work closely with Prof. Calestous Juma particularly during my public lectures in the US during which I also had the privilege of visiting him at the Belfer Centre for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University.

Juma represented the best of scholarship and public service. He believed in transferring knowledge to and empowering the next generation of young people of every nationality to shape the world.

Juma was particularly passionate in the use of technology in all spheres of life and more particularly in agriculture as a means of maximizing productivity and ensuring food security. He was also a keen believer in regional integration as a means of empowering citizens and bringing the world closer together.

As a country, we are all better off because we produced Prof. Juma. But it is possible that we could have tapped and benefitted more from his fountain of knowledge that he was always ready to offer particularly in the areas of modern agriculture, innovation, engineering, international development and biotechnology. I am aware of his attempts to start a high calibre college of Science and Technology in Western Kenya which never bore fruit due to lack of support. That effort now remains a dream deferred as we mourn him.

In his death, Kenya has lost not just a distinguished and refined scholar but also an ambassador who helped build the country’s profile across the globe while also creating platforms for the nation to showcase its worth and causes. We pray for and mourn with his family, the students and the entire Harvard University fraternity.

Rt. Hon Raila Odinga
December 15, 2017.

Mourning Hon. Francis Nyenze

Mourning Hon. Francis Nyenze

I joined the family of the late Kitui West MP Hon. Francis Nyenze in mourning his passing last week.

Hon. Nyenze was a dedicated leader who served the nation in many capacities as MP, Minister and Leader of Minority in Parliament; at various times during his career. His death comes as a blow to not only the NASA fraternity and the people of Kitui West, but the country at large.

May God grant his loved ones comfort during this trying time.